In the wake of the plague

In the Wake of the Plague - Black Death

Scientists have always been in agreement that the bubonic plague, along with its less common forms pneumonic and septicemic, played a role in the large mortality rates attributed to this epidemic, but questions have been raised on whether the plague was the exclusive cause of the event.

One way to wipe out a debt was to accuse the lender of a sinister crime, such as poisoning people. Peasants had formerly identified their place in society by who their lord was. Indeed, many saw the disease as God's punishment for sin. The peasants, including the clergy, had a forty percent mortality rate as compared to the aristocracy with a twenty-five percent mortality rate.

There was a peasant revolt in which almost eliminated the royal government. Cantor is a lecture-type book filled with some interesting facts and amusing side stories; it is easy to read at only pages long and does not have a single footnote.

Part of this suspicion was due to religious and economic reasons. The Nile was also the avenue disease used to spread throughout the world, including the latest one of note, the West Nile Virus.

The peasants were able to acquire better wages and benefits in a market short on labor. The destruction of the forests significantly reduced the supply of wild game. Land was an important commodity. Cantor's portrait of the Black Death's world is pro-vocative and captivating.

Richard II had some of the peasant leaders killed, and the revolt was shut down.

In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World It Made

The plague killed so many peasants that the remaining peasants were demanding lower rents and higher wages. To make up for this loss, the raising of livestock on farms and in pastures increased. As the comet travels, it expels large quantities of dust when it passes close to stars.

Cantor examines the way the Black Death affected particular families, institutions, cultures, and societies. This cattle disease resulted from a chain of events originating with the population explosion of the 13th century. As the comet travels, it expels large quantities of dust when it passes close to stars.

Cantor examines the way the Black Death affected particular families, institutions, cultures, and societies. These studies showed that materials expelled from the comet closely resemble organic matter found in space. The often literal demise of the old order meant that new, more scientific thinking increasingly prevailed where church dogma had once reigned supreme.

The discovery of Lucy, the earliest known human remains that were found in East Africa, supports this theory.

These emissions contained large numbers of bacteria and viruses of all kinds, which fell to the Earth and led In the wake of the plague infection. While the death of royalty to the disease was infrequent, the political implications of these losses were great.

All in all, Norman Cantor's book was a nice read. Coupling her death with the decrease in the Plantagenet population resources and economic power did sound like a very reasonable cause of England losing its continental empire.

Cantor relies on archeological evidence and historical documentation to support his claim. Joan tragically died of the plague in Bordeaux, which was devastated by the Black Death p.

We meet, among others, fifteen-year-old Princess Joan of England, on her way to Spain to marry a Castilian prince; Thomas of Birmingham, abbot of Halesowen, responsible for his abbey as a CEO is for his business in a desperate time; and the once-prominent landowner John le Strange, who sees the Black Death tear away his family's lands and then its very name as it washes, unchecked, over Europe in wave after wave.

The lower incidences of the disease among the Jewish population might have led to suspicions about their involvement as well. The other was a rare form of cattle disease, the most likely culprit being anthrax. This item: In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World It Made by Norman F.

Cantor Paperback $ Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Ships from and sold by belskiy/5(). In the Wake of the Plague; The details of the Plague etched in the minds of terrified schoolchildren the hideous black welts, the high fever, and the final, awful end by respiratory failure are more or less accurate.

But what the Plague really was, and how it made history, remain shrouded in a haze of myths. A New York Times bestseller, In the Wake of the Plague is a fascinating study of the cultural and religious consequences of one of the deadliest tragedies to befall humanity: the black plague. Though rigorously scientific in his approach, Norman F.

Cantor has produced an unforgettable narrative that 3/5(48). Cantor, Norman F., In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World it Made, (New York: Simon & Schuster, Inc., ).

plague and anthrax exhibit similar symptoms, it would be In the Wake of the Plague provides a great overview on the Black Death for the novice. The subdivisions of the book. Cantor, Norman F., In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World it Made, (New York: Simon & Schuster, Inc., ). plague and anthrax exhibit similar symptoms, it would be In the Wake of the Plague provides a great overview on the Black.

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In the wake of the plague
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